Guiding the International Community

  • Nicholas O. Berry

Abstract

The ICRC traditionally has encouraged other NGOs to follow its Funda- mental Principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity, and universality. With decades of experience, the ICRC knows that following these principles allows its workers to function in the field while minimizing the hazards of their very dangerous duties. The Principles facilitate humanitarian relief. The adoption of another mission prompted the ICRC to reiterate the principles as a set of rules—in order to guide all the players in the international community that might intervene in wars. These rules were needed to facilitate lessening the brutality of internal wars and eventually to make them dysfunctional and settled. Fulfilling both missions required a code of conduct.

Keywords

Europe Transportation Trench Paral Stake 

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Notes

  1. 10.
    As quoted in Larry Minear and Thomas G. Weiss, Humanitarian Politics, Headline Series No. 304 (Ithaca: Foreign Policy Association, 1995), p. 14.Google Scholar
  2. 11.
    François Jean, Life, Death and Aid: The Médecins sans Frontières Report on World Crisis Intervention (London: Routledge, 1993), p. 10.Google Scholar
  3. 12.
    Georges Willemin and Roger Heacock, The International Committee of the Red Cross (Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1984), p. 23.Google Scholar
  4. 18.
    Margaret Mead, “Warfare is Only an Invention-Not a Biological Necessity,” reprinted in John A Vasquez, ed., Classics of International Relations, 3rd ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996), p. 222.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Nicholas O. Berry 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas O. Berry

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