Beyond the Methods Fetish

Toward a Humanizing Pedagogy
  • Donaldo Macedo
  • Lilia I. Bartolomé

Abstract

As we discussed in chapters 1 and 2, the field of multicultural education and the education of linguistic minority students has been mostly defined by a plethora of methods designed primarily to teach tolerance. These methods not only blindly embrace the hidden (and sometimes not so opaque) assumption that the intolerable features of the “other” will be altered, reformed and, ultimately assimilated into an invisible culture of whiteness that serves as the yardstick against which cultural differences are measured. These methods also overemphasize teaching as a form of management of cultural differences while de-emphasizing learning, which is usually characterized by complexity, contradictions, and resistance. By focusing primarily on teaching methodology with respect to the education of culturally different students, even well-intentioned educators who want to give subordinated students voice fall prey to the weight of their complicity with the dominant ideology, which often remains beyond interrogation. With the exception of a handful of critical multiculturalists such as Christine Sleeter, Peter McLaren, Henry Giroux, David Goldberg, among others, most multicultural education as practice by many white liberals often refrains from deconstructing the dominant ideology that informs and shapes the asymmetrical distribution of cultural goods.

Keywords

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Notes

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© Donaldo Macedo and Lilia I. Bartolomé 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donaldo Macedo
  • Lilia I. Bartolomé

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