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The Transnational Dimension of the Judicialization of Politics in Latin America

  • Kathryn Sikkink
Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Abstract

Current trends toward the judicialization of politics in Latin America are deeply embedded in a context of regional and international legalization. In this chapter I argue that one cannot fully understand the domestic judicialization of politics in most Latin American countries without taking this regional and international context into account. For example, to understand outcomes in the area of the judicialization of human rights politics in many countries in Latin America, we also need to be attentive to developments in international and regional human rights law, as well as the role of transnational advocacy groups. Borrowing a concept from social movement theory, I believe that to understand the current level of judicialization of human rights policy in Latin America, it is necessary to situate it within its relevant international and domestic political and legal opportunity structure.

Keywords

Social Movement International Criminal Court Opportunity Structure Transitional Justice Political Opportunity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Rachel Sieder, Line Schjolden, and Alan Angell 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn Sikkink

There are no affiliations available

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