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Afterword: Breaking Away …

  • Ann Grodzins Gold
Part of the Religion/Culture/Critique book series (RCCR)

Abstract

Close engagement with the essays collected here—a set of writings richly conceived, complexly interwoven, and ethnographically substantial—has expanded my knowledge, dislodged false assumptions, and opened new horizons. This work’s total impact led me to wonder, as other readers may, whether the concept of renunciation in South Asian religions loses all coherence when we explore its multiple interpretations in such diverse contexts and stupendously messy realities. Where I am able to gather my thoughts is at the indeterminate yet momentous juncture of “breaking away.”

Keywords

Domestic Duty Spiritual Quest GoLD Gold Supreme Truth Ascetic Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Meena Khandelwal, Sondra L. Hausner, and Ann Grodzins Gold 2006

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  • Ann Grodzins Gold

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