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Introduction: Women on Their Own

  • Sondra L. Hausner
  • Meena Khandelwal
Part of the Religion/Culture/Critique book series (RCCR)

Abstract

The women who are the primary subjects of this book live unusual lives. They have broken away from the social roles and structures expected of them, in each of their various cultures. First and foremost, they are religious practitioners. Their primary social networks and the ways in which they relate to the world around them are charted through the lenses of religious devotion and duty, rather than the template of public expectations about feminine behavior. Their primary goals are liberation, enlightenment, and freedom from the cycles of samsara, the wheel of birth and death. In addition to the meditative or yogic disciplines they undertake to attain their religious ideals, they must tend to the exigencies of real life, the daily requirements of food and shelter for themselves and those who depend on them.

Keywords

Religious Practice South Asian Woman Sexual Fluid Hindu Woman Hindu Nationalism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Meena Khandelwal, Sondra L. Hausner, and Ann Grodzins Gold 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sondra L. Hausner
  • Meena Khandelwal

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