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More Ancient Prophecies

  • Jerome Friedman

Abstract

For more than a decade William Lilly, the parliamentary astrologer and interpreter of ancient prophecies, persuaded Englishmen that God smiled upon their revolution despite the evidence of apparitions, portents, and prodigies to the contrary. Charles I was the evil White King, and everything would work out for the best when the Chicken of the Eagle put things right. As late as 1657, Thomas Pugh’s mammoth collection of ancient prophecies continued to underscore the fact that the ancient texts supported the revolution.

Keywords

Title Page Ancient Text Latin Text Latin Grammar Heroic Deed 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    For the details of Wharton’s life, see Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1937-) 20:1313–15. Also, Harry Rusche, “Merlini Anglici: Astrology and Propaganda from 1641 to 1651,” English Historical Revue 80 (1965): 322ff. Wharton’s writings have been collected in The Works of George Wharton, ed. John Gadbury (London, 1683).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 5.
    Concerning Paul Grebner, see Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 1971); and Harry Rusche, “Prophecies and Propaganda, 1641 to 1651,” English Historical Revue 84 (1969): 765ff.Google Scholar
  3. 11.
    For details of Coppe’s life, see Dictionary of National Biography 4:1115. For an analysis of his views, see Jerome Friedman, Blasphemy, Immorality and Anarchy: The Ranters and the English Revolution (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1987), pp. 75–95.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Jerome Friedman 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome Friedman

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