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The Accountability Functions of Latin American Courts

  • Siri Gloppen
  • Bruce M. Wilson
  • Roberto Gargarella
  • Elin Skaar
  • Morten Kinander

Abstract

This chapter examines the accountability function of superior courts in three Latin American countries—Argentina, Chile, and Colombia—in the last two decades.1 This comparison appears promising because the respective courts have assumed very dissimilar roles in countries that share a common colonial and independence history, similar legal traditions, and relatively parallel histories regarding the effects of the international economic environment. How, then, can we explain the different legal outcomes in these countries? More specifically, what explains the fact that some of the superior courts have exercised an active accountability function whereas others have been rather deferential to the executive?

Keywords

Supreme Court Decision Constitutional Reform Constitutional Convention Supreme Court Justice Superior Court 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Bruce M. Wilson 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siri Gloppen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bruce M. Wilson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Roberto Gargarella
    • 1
    • 4
    • 5
  • Elin Skaar
    • 1
  • Morten Kinander
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Chr. Michelsen InstituteBergenNorway
  2. 2.University of BergenNorway
  3. 3.University of Central FloridaUSA
  4. 4.Argentina’s National Research Council (CONICET)Argentina
  5. 5.Universities of Torcuato Di Tella and UBA in Buenos AiresArgentina
  6. 6.Wiersholm, Mellbye & BechNorway

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