Advertisement

Transcendental Doctrine of Elements

  • Immanuel Kant

Abstract

In whatever manner and by whatever means a mode of knowledge2 may relate to objects, intuition is that through which it is in immediate relation to them, and to which all thought as a means is directed. But intuition takes place only in so far as the object is given to us. This again is only possible, to man at least,3 in so far as the mind is affected in a certain way. The capacity (receptivity) for receiving representations through the mode in which we are affected by objects, is entitled sensibility. Objects are given to us by means of sensibility, and it alone yields us intuitions; they are thought through the understanding, and from the understanding arise concepts. But all thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters,4 relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us.

Keywords

Pure Reason Transcendental Philosophy Pure Intuition Transcendental Object Transcendental Logic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Immanuel Kant

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations