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Growing Girls/Closing Circles: Limits on the Spaces of Knowing in Rural Sudan and United States Cities

  • Cindi Katz

Abstract

Social power is reflected in and exercised through the production and control of space. These socio-spatial relations are gendered and vary across the life course, riddled by differences associated with class, ethnicity, race, and nationality. From “dad’s chair” to occupied national territories, the spatial forms of control are charged with and interpenetrated by political-economic power, cultural meaning, and personal significance. These conjunctures are neither stable over time nor distributed evenly across space. This chapter explores their form and significance at particular periods and transitions in the life course of females emphasizing the shifts from childhood to youth and womanhood in two divergent settings—rural Sudan and urban United States.

Keywords

Spatial Ability Social Reproduction Walk Away Sexual Division Spatial Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dorothy Hodgson 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cindi Katz

There are no affiliations available

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