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Introduction

Of Modernity/Modernities, Gender, and Ethnography
  • Dorothy L. Hodgson

Abstract

Modernity, according to Marshall Berman and others, seems to have penetrated everywhere in the globe, overcoming physical boundaries of space and social barriers of difference. Yet the experience of modernity may be simultaneously seductive and threatening, freeing and restraining, creative and stultifying. Its power of “creative destruction” (Harvey 1989:16), destroying the old to build the new, has been a deeply ambivalent and contradictory process, a dilemma aptly summarized by the elder Maasai man.

Keywords

Gender Ideology Rural Youth Vintage Book Modernist Project Bedouin Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dorothy Hodgson 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy L. Hodgson

There are no affiliations available

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