The Art of Witnessing and the Community of the Ought to Be

  • Drucilla Cornell

Abstract

Trinh T. Minh-ha’s “Grandma’s Story” evokes the power of women’s stories to connect generations to generations and keep alive a history that would otherwise die out. From these stories and their power, the woman writer shapes herself. This oral tradition keeps “alive the forgotten, dead-ended, turned-into-stone parts of ourselves. ”2

Keywords

Burning Europe Coherence Resis Ghost 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    See Trinh T. Minh-ha, Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989 ), p. 122.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    See Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, A Critique of Postcolonial Reason: Toward a History of the Vanishing Present ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1999 ), pp. 198–311.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    See Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak “Subaltern Studies: Deconstructing Historiography,” In Other Worlds (New York and London: Methuen, 1987), pp. 197–221.Google Scholar
  4. 43.
    See Friedrich Schiller, “On the Sublime,” Friedrich Schiller: Essays, eds. Walter Hinderer and Daniel O. Dahlstrom ( New York: Continuum Publishing Company, 1998 ), p. 35.Google Scholar
  5. 49.
    See Schiller, “On the Sublime,” Friedrich Schiller: Essays, eds. Walter Hinderer and Daniel O. Dahlstrom ( New York: Continuum Publishing Company, 1998 ), p. 42.Google Scholar
  6. 54.
    See Hannah Arendt, Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy, ed. Ronald Beiner (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982 ), p. 77.Google Scholar

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© Drucilla Cornell 2002

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  • Drucilla Cornell

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