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The Diaspora

  • Henry Nicholls
Part of the Macmillan Science book series (MACSCI)

Abstract

There are probably about a thousand Galápagos giant tortoises in zoos and private collections around the world. It’s a bit of a long shot, but it’s just possible that one of them is a Pinta animal collected from the island in the late 19th or early 20th century. Ever since the Charles Darwin Foundation offered a reward of $10,000 for a Pinta female, the search has been on in this large population of captive tortoises.

Keywords

Natural History Museum Private Collection California Academy Vital Clue Private Collector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and sources

  1. $10,000 reward: cited in Marquez et al. (2001)Google Scholar
  2. ‘There was a sense that this opportunity was going to end’: Edward J. Larson, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  3. Details of Commander Cookson’s visit: Cookson (1876a, 1876b)Google Scholar
  4. ‘They are still tolerably numerous near Tagus Cove’: Cookson (1876b)Google Scholar
  5. ‘One of these, owing to want of sufficient hands …’: Cookson (1876b)Google Scholar
  6. ‘to lower them over the cliff, a height of about 200 feet’: Cookson (1876b)Google Scholar
  7. ‘I could not preserve all alive …’: Cookson (1876b)Google Scholar
  8. California Academy expedition: Van Denburgh (1914); Fritts and Fritts (1982)Google Scholar
  9. ‘It is capital country for tortoises’: Van Denburgh (1914)Google Scholar
  10. Rothschild’s reaction to Cookson’s letter: see Rothschild (1983)Google Scholar
  11. ‘I believe they are doomed …’: Cookson (1876b)Google Scholar
  12. ‘to bring away every tortoise they saw …’: cited in Rothschild (1983)Google Scholar
  13. Details of Webster-Harris expedition: Rothschild and Hartert (1899)Google Scholar
  14. ‘I instructed each man to collect …’: cited in Rothschild and Hartert (1899)Google Scholar
  15. ‘Do not think tortoise exist here cited in Rothschild and Hartert (1899)Google Scholar
  16. Beck ships ‘old mossback’ to Rothschild in summer of 1901: Beck, R. H. (1901) Letter to Dr Ernest Hartert, dated 8 July 1901, Berryessa, California, Rothschild Collection, Natural History Museum, LondonGoogle Scholar
  17. ‘at the foot of the cliff …’: Beck to Hartert, 8 July 1901Google Scholar
  18. ‘One day our largest tortoise …’: Beck to Hartert, 8 July 1901Google Scholar
  19. ‘If you wish these as skins …’: Beck to Hartert, 8 July 1901Google Scholar
  20. ‘If they will I will ship alive …’: Beck, R. H. (1901) Letter to Dr Ernest Hartert dated 10 September 1901, Berryessa, California, Rothschild CollectionGoogle Scholar
  21. Beck skins the one-eyed Pinta female: Beck, R. H. (1901) Letter to Dr Ernest Hartert, dated 29 October 1901, Berryessa, California, Rothschild CollectionGoogle Scholar
  22. One-eyed female could offer vital clues in the search for a mate for George: Pritchard (1984)Google Scholar
  23. Rediscovery of the forest owlet: Pamela Rasmussen, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  24. ‘Periods of malnutrition or rapid growth …’: Thomas Fritts, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  25. Unusual shell shape of Pritchard’s 1972 find: Pritchard (1984); Pritchard, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  26. Possible Pinta tortoises at the Smithsonian: Fritts, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  27. Yale analysis of DNA from unidentified tortoises: Burns et al. (2003)Google Scholar
  28. Pinniped penises: Malik et al. (1997)Google Scholar
  29. Genetic analysis of Galápagos tortoises by Edward Louis: Edward Louis, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  30. DNA sampling of South American captive tortoises: Michael Russello, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  31. Tony at Prague Zoo: Petr Velenský, personal communicationGoogle Scholar
  32. Spix’s macaw: Juniper (2002)Google Scholar
  33. Return of Presley to Brazil: Anon. (2003) Spix’s macaw returned to sender, Birdlife International, 14 April 2003Google Scholar
  34. Caloosahatchee Aviary: Greg Moss, personal communicationGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Henry Nicholls 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry Nicholls

There are no affiliations available

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