Dreams pp 93-110 | Cite as

Sending a Voice, Seeking a Place

Visionary Traditions among Native Women of the Plains
  • Lee Irwin

Abstract

According to the Lakota holy man Nicholas Black Elk, hambleyapi, or “crying for a vision,” predates even the use of the sacred pipe and is the center of Plains Indian spirituality. This emphasis on dreams and visions acquired either spontaneously or through a vision quest is one of the central and unifying factors among many Native American religious traditions. The very earliest historical records all bear eloquent witness to the long-standing importance of the vision quest experience and the close attention given to their contents, enactment, and the ways in which dreaming contributed to cultural transformation and personal achievement. It is these historical sources that I wish to explore, particularly as they relate to women dreamers and visionaries, in order to provide a summary overview of the value and importance of dreams and visions for traditional Plains women.1

Keywords

Corn Tuberculosis Smoke Hunt Bark 

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Copyright information

© Kelly Bulkeley 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Irwin

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