Dreams pp 209-221 | Cite as

Wish, Conflict, and Awareness

Freud and the Problem of the “Dream Book”
  • Bertram J. Cohler
Chapter

Abstract

Freud’s study The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), often referred to as the “Dream Book,” remains a controversial work even a century after its publication. In this work Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) both demonstrates a technique for understanding subjectivity and elaborates a theory for understanding mental life. However, it was founded on perspectives from the neurosciences (Sulloway 1979), and there has been considerable critical discussion regarding Freud’s theory of dream formation (Fiss 2000, Hobson 1988, Hartmann 1998; Pribram and Gill 1976). Recognizing the validity of this critique (which Freud himself, as a biologist of the mind [Sulloway, 1979], would likely have endorsed), the “Dream Book” still remains Freud’s most systematic and programmatic statement of a theory of mental life, informing his subsequent work across half a century and providing an approach to the study of mental life that has had a major influence on contemporary culture (Freud 1930).

Keywords

Tuberculosis Syringe Cocaine Resi Stein 

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Copyright information

© Kelly Bulkeley 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bertram J. Cohler

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