The uncertain quest for sustainability: public discourse and the politics of environmentalism

  • Douglas Torgerson

Abstract

Upon entering the public scene, environmentalism disturbed the established discourse of advanced industrial society. While technically focused discourse could usually overwhelm concerns about the morality of dominating nature, doubt about the human ability to dominate nature was more worrisome. The future was dramatically thrown into question, and the doubt proved especially troubling when expressed through the scientistic idiom of technical discourse.

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Copyright information

© Douglas Torgerson 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas Torgerson
    • 1
  1. 1.Trent UniversityCanada

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