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Bronenosets Potemkin/Potyomkin (The Battleship Potemkin)

  • Birgit Beumers
Chapter

Abstract

Voted the best film of all time by an international critics’ poll conducted in 1958, Sergei Eisenstein’ s The Battleship Potemkin (Bronenosets Potemkin/Potyomkin, 1926) was produced in the Soviet Union at a time when that country was pioneering a new form of social and economic order: socialism. In the nationalised Soviet film industry the state controlled film production, a situation which highlights the relationship between art and politics during the early years of the Soviet regime. Indeed, many Russian artists, especially those of the left-wing avant-garde movements of the 1910s, hailed the 1917 Revolution and actively supported its cause, some by taking up posts in the political structures, others by putting their art at the service of the new ideals. At this time the state also realised cinema’s potential for agitation of the masses and for political propaganda. It is within this context that an analysis of The Battleship Potemkin must be located.

Keywords

Soviet Regime October Revolution Firing Squad Political Propaganda Entire Fleet 
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References

  1. Taylor, Richard (ed.) 1998: The Eisenstein Reader. London: British Film Institute.Google Scholar
  2. Taylor, Richard and Christie, Ian (eds) 1994: The Film Factory. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Suggestions for Further Reading

  1. Aumont, Jacques 1987: Montage Eisenstein. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Barna, Yon 1973: Eisenstein. London: Secker & Warburg.Google Scholar
  3. Bordwell, David 1993: The Cinema of Eisenstein. Cambridge, MA, and London: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Eisenstein, Sergei 1949: Film Form. Edited and translated by Jay Leyda. New York: Harcourt Brace.Google Scholar
  5. Kenez, Peter 1992: Cinema and Soviet Society, 1917–1953. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Taylor, Richard (ed.) 1998: The Eisenstein Reader. London: British Film Institute.Google Scholar
  7. Taylor, Richard 1979: The Politics of the Soviet Cinema, 1917–1929. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Taylor, Richard 1999: The Battleship Potemkin. London: I. B. Tauris.Google Scholar
  9. Taylor, Richard and Ian Christie (eds) 1994: The Film Factory. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Birgit Beumers 2000

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  • Birgit Beumers

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