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Post-Secession Economic Viability

  • Milica Zarkovic Bookman

Abstract

The period of reequilibration is characterized by precarious adjustments in the political, social, and economic spheres. Post-secessionist regions will vary in their ability to tide over the hurdles that will present themselves after severance of ties with the center. With respect to the economic adjustment, its smoothness will depend upon several economic characteristics that are embodied in the term viability. Economic viability is a concept often used and rarely defined. A simple working definition adopted here is the following: viability of a region implies the ability to sustain growth in the aftermath of secession at the preindependence levels. In adopting this definition, a distinction must be made between the short run and the long run, since most regions are capable of economic survival in the long run after forging new relationships with the international economy and the nation from which they seceded. With secession, regions strive to at least continue (if not improve) their level of economic performance. The concept of an economic status quo in the aftermath of secession has been addressed by Buchanon, who points out that, from a philosophical perspective, there is no reason to assume that a region has a right to an economic status quo. Indeed, according to Buchanon, “this dubious principle of entitlement to the status quo” is simply not justified in either secession or divorce.3 It is nevertheless a useful tool used in hypothesizing about post-secessionist viability.

Keywords

Labor Force Economic Viability Soviet Republic Economic Survival Trade Dependency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 3.
    Allen Buchanon, Secession, Boulder: Westview Press, 1991, p. 92.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    This was briefly discussed in chapter 4 and is treated at length in M. Zarkovic, Issues in Indian Agricultural Development, Boulder: Westview Press, 1987.Google Scholar
  3. 10.
    Regione Lombarda, Guida Pratica Delia Lombardia, Milan: Amilcare Pizzi, 1990, p. 14.Google Scholar
  4. 12.
    Deutsche Bank, The Soviet Union at the Crossroads: Facts and Figures on the Soviet Republics, Frankfurt: Deutsche Bank, 1991, p. 24.Google Scholar
  5. 14.
    Louis Snyder, Global Mini-Nationalisms: Autonomy or Independence, West-port: Greenwood Press, 1982, p. 186.Google Scholar
  6. 17.
    James Griffin, “Movements for Separation and Secession,” in Anthony Clunies Ross and John Langmore, eds., Alternative Strategies for Papua New Guinea, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1973, p. 126.Google Scholar
  7. 19.
    Howard Epstein, ed., Revolt in the Congo1960–64, New York: Facts on File, 1965, p. 177.Google Scholar
  8. 20.
    Rene Lemarchand, Political Awakening in the Belgian Congo, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1964, p. 234.Google Scholar
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    Fernand Hernan, Courrier Africain, March 4, 1960. Notes to Chapter 8Google Scholar
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    William L. Langer, An Encyclopedia of World History, 5th ed., Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1972.Google Scholar
  11. 6.
    The role of the Catholic church in anti-Serbian war activities in Croatia during World War II is discussed in the following: The Economist, August 22, 1992, p. 36; and Stewart Lamont, Church and State: Uneasy Alliances, London: Bodley Head, 1989, p. 146. Furthermore, the Croatian minister of the interior of the independent fascist government during World War II, A. Artukovic, stated at his trial that whatever he and his Ustashas had done conformed to the principals of morality of the Catholic church (Borba, December 26, 1988).Google Scholar
  12. 9.
    Conor Cruise O’Brien, Godland: Reflections on Religion and Nationalism, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988, p. 40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 10.
    Regione Lombarda, Guida Pratica Delia Lombardia, Milan: Amilcare Pizzi, 1990, p. 14.Google Scholar
  14. 12.
    Deutsche Bank, The Soviet Union at the Crossroads: Facts and Figures on the Soviet Republics, Frankfurt: Deutsche Bank, 1991, p. 24.Google Scholar
  15. 14.
    Louis Snyder, Global Mini-Nationalisms: Autonomy or Independence, West-port: Greenwood Press, 1982, p. 186.Google Scholar
  16. 17.
    James Griffin, “Movements for Separation and Secession,” in Anthony Clunies Ross and John Langmore, eds., Alternative Strategies for Papua New Guinea, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1973, p. 126.Google Scholar
  17. 19.
    Howard Epstein, ed., Revolt in the Congo 1960–64, New York: Facts on File, 1965, p. 177.Google Scholar
  18. 20.
    Rene Lemarchand, Political Awakening in the Belgian Congo, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1964, p. 234.Google Scholar
  19. 21.
    Fernand Hernan, Courrier Africain, March 4, 1960.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Milica Zarkovic Bookman 1992

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  • Milica Zarkovic Bookman

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