The Speculum Virginum and Traditions of Medieval Dialogue

  • Sabina Flanagan
Part of the The New Middle Ages book series (TNMA)

Abstract

This chapter situates the Speculum virginum within the broader context of dialogue literature in the twelfth century. The genre was employed to provide instruction in a wide range of subjects.The Speculum is unusual, however, in that it adapts a literary technique normally employed to instruct boys and young men to an extended dialogue between a spiritual guide and his female disciple. Seen in this light, the Speculum emerges as a work of great creative originality that applies the questioning technique of scholastic literature to discussing the religious life for women in an unusually vivid way.

Keywords

Europe Assured Sine Defend Huygens 

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Notes

  1. 4.
    R. B. C. Huygens, ed., Accessus ad auctores. Bernard d’Utrecht. Conrad d’Hirsau, Dialogus super auctores (Leiden: Brill, 1970), pp. 71–131Google Scholar
  2. Robert Bultot, ed., Dialogus de mundi contemptu vel amore, attribué d Conrad d’Hirsau. Extraits de l’Allocutio ad deum et du De veritatis inquisitione. Textes inédits Analecta Mediaevalia Namurcensia 19 (Louvain: Editions Nauwelaerts, 1966). On these texts and the Altercatio Synagogae et Ecclesiae printed in Cologne in 1534, see Mews, chapter 1 in this volume.Google Scholar
  3. 22.
    See Richard W Southern, Scholastic Humanism and the Unification of Europe, vol. 1 (Oxford: Blackwell, 1995), pp. 225–30.Google Scholar
  4. 47.
    Richard William Southern, Saint Anselm: A Portrait in a Landscape (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), p. 203.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Constant J. Mews 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabina Flanagan

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