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Theory Development and Integration in Foreign Policy Analysis: Directions for Future Research

  • Alex Mintz
Part of the Advances in Foreign Policy Analysis book series (AFPA)

Abstract

The preceding chapters have demonstrated the usefulness of the poliheuristic theory (PH) in explaining foreign policy decisions. The theory integrates elements of cognitive political psychology (e.g., Stein and Welch 1997) with the insights provided by rational analysis of decision making (e.g., Bueno de Mesquita 1981; Bueno de Mesquita and Lalman 1992).

Keywords

Foreign Policy Prospect Theory Strategic Interaction Sequential Decision American Political Science Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Alex Mintz 2003

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  • Alex Mintz

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