Integrating Cognitive and Rational Theories of Foreign Policy Decision Making: A Poliheuristic Perspective

  • Alex Mintz
Part of the Advances in Foreign Policy Analysis book series (AFPA)

Abstract

There are currently two “schools” of thought in political decision making in general and foreign policy decision making in particular: the rational choice school and the cognitive psychology school. This book introduces a theory of decision making that integrates elements of both schools.

Keywords

Syria Stein Dien Boulder Milton 

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Copyright information

© Alex Mintz 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Mintz

There are no affiliations available

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