Disguising Doom: A Study of the Linguistic Features of Audience Manipulation in Michael Moorcock’s The Eternal Champion

  • Michael Hoey

Abstract

Michael Moorcock’s The Eternal Champion (1970) has a simple enough plot. Humans on a parallel Earth call to their aid an eternal champion, Erekosë, to help them rid the world of the Evil Ones, the Eldren. He does so, almost wiping them out. At the last he realises that they were not evil after all but that the humans were the truly evil ones. So he switches sides and proceeds to wipe out the human race:

Two months before I had been responsible for winning the cities of Mernadin for Humanity. Now I reclaimed them in the name of the Eldren […] I destroyed every human being occupying them […] Not merely the great cities were destroyed. Villages were destroyed. Hamlets were destroyed. Towns and farms were destroyed. I found some people hiding in caves. The caves were destroyed. I destroyed forests where they might flee. I destroyed stones that they might creep under […] It was fated that Humanity should die on this planet.1

Keywords

Dust Trench Metaphor Folk Plague 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Michael Moorcock The Eternal Champion (London: Mayflower, 1970), p. 157. Subsequent page references in text.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jacqueline L. Harvey ‘A Sting in the Tale: An Examination of the Features of Surprise Ending Narratives’ (Unpublished M.Phil. Thesis, University of Birmingham, 1996).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Mike Scott, WordSmith Tools (2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997).Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Vladimir Propp, The Morphology of the Folktale (1928; Austin: University of Texas Press, 1968).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Hoey

There are no affiliations available

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