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Introduction Between Universalism and the Recognition of Otherness

  • Y. Michal Bodemann

Abstract

Friedrich Engels’s report refers to what we might call the first multicultural festival; a festival attended by “more than a thousand democrats” that took place over 160 years ago, on September 22, 1845, and was organized by the Chartist “Democratic Association,” composed, as he put it, of local citizens and of émigrés from the continent living in London. It commemorated the French Revolution, fifty years earlier, and its own founding, just six years before. This festival did not come about without difficulty. Engels reports that earlier, similar attempts had been made to unify behind such a festival, but the “obstacle to all unification, due to difference of nationality” was too great: the “foreigners” were too isolated from the “movement going on before their eyes,” and on the English side, “partly because of national mistrust,” presumably national prejudice, the project could not be realized.

Keywords

French Revolution Moral Panic German Sociology Jewish Background French Republic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Gökçe Yurdakul and Y. Michal Bodemann 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Michal Bodemann

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