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What Experienced Teachers Recommend: A Survey and Analysis

  • Christopher J. Lucas

Abstract

Atraditional method of evaluating a teacher education program relies on follow-up data supplied by recent graduates. Those polled are asked to complete a survey, providing judgments as to the worth of the program and its various courses in helping former students in their new teaching positions.1 Program assessments of this type have become quite common. Dorothy H. Mayne, for example, reported the results of an extensive survey undertaken by the University of Alaska to improve its teacher-training program and services to teachers using an instrument completed by 52 principals and teachers in 46 rural Alaskan high schools.2 Similar in purpose was a study of the Master of Education degree program in Special Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.3 Data collected both from students and from teachers who were program graduates were utilized to revise the content of certain courses, to change the overall pattern of courses required, and to modify preservice student teaching assignments.

Keywords

Teacher Education Preservice Teacher Teacher Education Program Teacher Preparation Teacher Candidate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Christopher J. Lucas 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Lucas

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