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The Beatification of the Mundane

  • Christopher A. Dustin
  • Joanna E. Ziegler

Abstract

Faraway lands and exotic delicacies, graceful tea ceremonies, warrior swords, kingly harps, and exquisite quills play across the surface of this diminutive text—The Book of Tea.1 An odd turn to take, especially after Thoreau’s frankly down-to-earth field of study with which the tea ceremony makes a rather odd coupling indeed. After all, Okakura Kakuzo lived considerably far removed from woods, in Asian tea-rooms and the galleries of high art museums, among fabled myths and ravishingly gossamer images of “the Orient” in pen-and-ink. Art connoisseur, curator, defender of Japan’s cultural legacy, Okakura is no Thoreauvian American naturalist. On the face of it, the consummate formality and absolute aestheticism of The Book of Tea look utterly and impossibly opposed to the rustic walking celebrated by Thoreau.

Keywords

Diet Soft Drink Daily Ritual Consummate Formality Tangible Incarnation Fateful Drama 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Christopher A. Dustin and Joanna E. Ziegler 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher A. Dustin
  • Joanna E. Ziegler

There are no affiliations available

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