Advertisement

Walking: Thoreau’s Prepared Vision

  • Christopher A. Dustin
  • Joanna E. Ziegler

Abstract

What does walking have to do with seeing? The connection seems obvious: they are related as means and ends. If you wish to see something, you need to get close enough and position yourself so as to gain a clear and unobstructed view of it. You must be “moved,” in a purely physical sense. Conversely, if you wish to get somewhere, you need to see where you are going—to watch out for obstacles, that is, to watch out for yourself, and to be sure that you are headed in the right direction. Otherwise, you might get lost, and never reach your destination. In the first case, walking is the means and seeing is the end; in the second, it is the other way around. In both cases, the end is distinct from the means (even if both happen at the same time).

Keywords

Visible Reality Ultimate Reason Dismal Swamp False Idealization Unobstructed View 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Christopher A. Dustin and Joanna E. Ziegler 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher A. Dustin
  • Joanna E. Ziegler

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations