The Muslim Brotherhood: Ideology and Program

  • Barry Rubin


The repression that the Muslim Brothers suffered in the past -including a period of almost two decades when it was totally outlawed — has affected its attitudes toward the government, revolution, violence, and the ideology of the revolutionary fundamentalists. The Brothers have been successful at reestablishing their structure and maintaining their freedom only at the government’s sufferance, and their leaders are well aware of this. The relationship between the movement and the national leaders — Sadat, then Mubarak — has had a profound effect on the Brotherhood’s thinking. It now claims status as a legal, reform-oriented group trying to improve society rather than seize power.


Investment Company Islamic Bank Muslim Brotherhood Secret Organization Islamic Group 


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Notes and References

  1. 2.
    Adil Hummudah, “Are the Brothers Abandoning Violence?,” Ruz al-Yusuf, 3032 (July 21, 1986) pp. 30–4.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    Karim Alrawi, “End of an Era,” Inquiry, 3 (7) (July 1986) pp. 16–17.Google Scholar
  3. 19.
    Jamal Isma’il, “The Split between the Wafd and the Muslim Brotherhood,” Ruz al-Yusuf, 2924 (June 25, 1984) pp. 10–12.Google Scholar
  4. 27.
    Olivier Carré, “Le Combat-pour-Dieu et L’État Islamique, chez Sayyid Qutb, l’inspirateur du radicalism islamique actuel,” Revue de Science Politique Française, 33 (4) (August 1983) p. 683.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 33.
    Jamal Isma’il, “Will ‘the Society’ Become a Political Party?,” Al-Dustur, 16 (434) (June 23, 1986) pp. 18–20.Google Scholar
  6. 35.
    Mustafa Bakr, “The Controversy with the Muslim Brotherhood about the New Guide,” Al-Musawwar, 3215 (May 23, 1986) pp. 10–11.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Barry Rubin 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Rubin

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