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“Modern Indian Religious Life”

  • James Treat

Abstract

A storm was brewing over Winnipeg. The cold north wind rolling off the Canadian shield whistled an eerie tune, erasing any doubts about the arrival of winter. Office workers scurried along sidewalks and ducked into entryways without lingering for Monday-morning gossip. This seasonal turn had convinced pedestrians to move at a quicker pace but it was having the opposite effect on mechanized transport; schedule delays were already being announced at the local airport, where a couple of native spiritual leaders were expected on flights from the south. Bob Thomas, Ian MacKenzie, and Wilf Pelletier watched and waited for the skies to clear, anxious to receive these last two delegates so they could begin their planned meeting. Someone in the welcoming party voiced his fear that this bad weather was the work of tribal conjurers, who might be using malevolent powers to thwart their effort at ecumenical organizing. Interreligious conversation can be a risky venture.1

Keywords

Committee Member Native People Steering Committee Religious Leader Indian Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 8.
    “Indian Ecumenical Conference Report,” [August 13–19], [1970], 4, ACC/PWRDF, collection GS93–27, box 7; James Treat, “Introduction: Native Christian Narrative Discourse,” in Native and Christian: Indigenous Voices on Religious Identity in the United States and Canada, edited by James Treat (New York, NY: Routledge, 1996), 8–9; MacKenzie, February 18, 2000.Google Scholar
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© James Treat 2003

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  • James Treat

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