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“The Churches Must Listen”

  • James Treat

Abstract

A roomful of devout Christians had come under conviction. “I suggest to you that you pursue conversion,” Dave Courchene told his well-dressed audience of Anglican clergy and lay leaders: “Conversion of the church from passive observers of the plight of the underprivileged to active participants in the fight for social progress.” The energetic president of the Manitoba Indian Brotherhood, a prominent native political organization, was speaking to delegates assembled for the twenty-fourth General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada. It was August 20, 1969, the third day of their periodic national gathering, which was being held this year in Sudbury, Ontario. General Synod organizers had planned an agenda for the day focusing on “The Changing World” and invited Courchene to give the keynote address, asking him to comment on “how an Indian looks at the future.” He was pleased by the opportunity to present his views, hoping that “through better communication we will create an atmosphere of better understanding.”1

Keywords

Native People Indian Work Tribal Community Church Leader Residential School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 6.
    Charles E. Hendry, Beyond Traplines: Does the Church Really Care? Towards an Assessment of the Work of the Anglican Church of Canada with Canada’s Native Peoples (Toronto, Ontario: Ryerson Press, 1969), 71ff, 91–92; “The Hendry Report,” Canadian Churchman 96, no. 5 (1969): 1; Willie, “Address,” 19.Google Scholar
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© James Treat 2003

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  • James Treat

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