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Epilogue

“Teachings from This Fire”
  • James Treat

Abstract

In the summer of 1988 I was browsing the used books section at Moe’s, less than two blocks from the rooming house where I stayed, when I discovered a perfect hardbound copy of John Snow’s These Mountains Are Our Sacred Places. I had seen references to the book—and to the Indian Ecumenical Conference—in my research on native religious traditions, an interest that was intensifying after a year of exploring various subjects through course work at the Graduate Theological Union. How this obscure Canadian publication had made its way to a Telegraph Avenue bookstore in Berkeley was a mystery to me, but I did recognize the out-of-print book as a bargain at seventeen dollars and quickly added it to my meager library. A year later Snow’s insights on creation, natural law, revelation, biculturalism, and “the Indian Religious Movement” figured into my master’s thesis, titled “Native Americans, Theology, and Liberation.” The research conducted for that project eventually led to the publication of two edited volumes, each of which contains brief mention of the Conference.1

Keywords

Native People Tribal Community Spiritual Leader Spiritual Tradition Indian Country 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© James Treat 2003

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  • James Treat

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