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The Peripheralisation of Africa in Global Politics

  • Paul Rich

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa faces rather a bleak future of growing international indifference and neglect in the wake of the collapse of Cold War ideological divisions in global politics. The Cold War division of the international system into a bipolar model of conflict ensured that the newly-emerging African states in the period after 1945 could exert a considerable degree of political leverage on the rival Western and Communist blocs. Post-colonial states in Africa were provided with a high degree of external political, economic and ideological support, which tended to some degree to disguise or distort the more general process of economic and political marginalisation of the continent from the rest of the global economy.

Keywords

African State European Colonial Global Politics Governing Elite Modern African Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Rich

There are no affiliations available

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