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The Rise of Bulgaria, 8th–10th Centuries

  • Dennis P. Hupchick
  • Harold E. Cox

Abstract

The treaty of 681 with Byzantium granted the Bulgars territories south of the Danube and north of the Balkan Mountains. From their capital at Pliska, the Bulgar hans (rulers) controlled the Slavic inhabitants of their newly-acquired lands, as well as Wallachia and other lands north of the Danube stretching northeastward to the Eurasian steppes. Under the successive heirs of Asparuh, the new state’s founder, Bulgaria (also known as the First Bulgarian Empire) attempted to expand its territories in the Balkans at Byzantine expense, either through peaceful and favorable alliances with the imperial authorities (such as Tervel’s [701–18] with Emperor Justinian II [705–11]) or through warfare. By the opening of the 9th century, Bulgar ruler Krum (808–14), who from his capital at Pliska ruled a large state stretching to Great Moravia in the north, was in the position to commence life-threatening attacks on the Byzantine Empire.

Keywords

Turkic People Eurasian Steppe Western Balkans Balkan Mountain Byzantine Empire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Dennis P. Hupchick and Harold E. Cox 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis P. Hupchick
    • 1
  • Harold E. Cox
    • 1
  1. 1.Wilkes-BarreUSA

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