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Dynamic Representation: The Case of European Integration

  • Hermann Schmitt
  • Jacques Thomassen
Part of the Europe in Transition: The NYU European Studies Series book series (EIT)

Abstract

This chapter raises two questions: Why are party voters less favorable toward specific EU policies than are party elites? Second, how does political representation of EU preferences actually work? Is it an eliteor a mass-driven process? The data sets of the European Election Studies 1979 and 1994 are analyzed, which involve both an elite and a mass survey component. In contrast to earlier research, it appears that political representation of EU preferences works rather well regarding the grand directions of policymaking, and that party elites behave responsively in view of changing EU preferences among their voters.

Keywords

Political Representation American Political Science Review National Party Mass Public Party Elite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pascal Perrineau, Gérard Grunberg, and Colette Ysmal 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hermann Schmitt
  • Jacques Thomassen

There are no affiliations available

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