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Introduction: Context(ure)s of Human Rights—Local Realities, Global Contexts

  • Obioma Nnaemeka
  • Joy Ngozi Ezeilo
Part of the Comparative Feminist Studies book series (CFS)

Abstract

Achieving human rights for all has been a major preoccupation of the international community since the end of the World War II. Yet, at the dawn of the twenty-first century, and after more than fifty years of engagements by the United Nations (UN) and its member states in human rights standards-setting, we are still confronted with questions about whether human rights are the same everywhere for everyone, irrespective of race, sex, gender, color, nationality, ethnicity, language, religion, political opinion, and other prohibited grounds for discrimination.1 Evidently, this has raised questions about the notion of the universality of human rights—particularly women’s rights—and whether they are truly universal after all. Put differently, are women’s rights truly human rights as they are locally and globally legislated and enforced?2 Is international law an appropriate vehicle for enhancing and guaranteeing equality for women?3 What would women who were differently situated make of human rights laws? Are “rights” mere rhetoric and of no utility in a multicultural and racialized world?4 How can we transform the human rights agenda and regimes to respond adequately to the concerns of all women?

Keywords

Reproductive Health United Nations United Nations Development Program Female Genital Mutilation African Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Obioma Nnaemeka and Joy Ngozi Ezeilo 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Obioma Nnaemeka
  • Joy Ngozi Ezeilo

There are no affiliations available

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