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Conclusion

  • Arden Bucholz
Chapter
Part of the European History in Perspective book series (EUROHIP)

Abstract

Dealing with a legend is always hazardous. Moltke is arguably one of the five or ten most famous Germans of all time. In December 1899, at the turn of the millennium, the Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung conducted a reader survey. What was the most important invention of the century? The railroad. What was the most significant event? The unification of Germany. Who was the greatest statesman? Bismarck. Who was the century’s greatest thinker? Not Darwin, Kant, Schopenhauer or Nietzsche, but Moltke! He also came in a close second to Napoleon as the most important military leader.1

Keywords

Negative Baggage German Army Grand Slam Present Strength Combat Effectiveness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Franz Herre, Moltke, Der Mann und sein Jahrhundert (2nd edn, Stuttgart, 1984), p. 9.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    Friedrich A. Dressler, Moltke in His Home (London, 1907), pp. 152–8.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    Robert H. Scales, Jr, ‘Cycles of War’, Armed Forces Journal International, July 1997, pp. 38–42.Google Scholar
  4. 10.
    Clayton M. Christensen, The Innovator’s Dilemma (Cambridge, Mass., 1999)Google Scholar
  5. Fred Andrews, ‘A Primer on Weathering Technologies Storms’, New York Times, 3 November 1999, p. C10.Google Scholar
  6. 21.
    Martin van Creveld, Fighting Power: German and US Army Performance, 1939–1945 (Wesport, Conn., 1982), pp. 3–6Google Scholar
  7. Trevor N. Dupuy, A Genius for War (London, 1977), pp. 234–6.Google Scholar
  8. 24.
    Cf. Douglas Foster, ‘Bugged’ in the New York Times Magazine, 31 October 1999, p. 68.Google Scholar
  9. 25.
    For this and what follows I am indebted to Chris C. Demchak, Military Organizations, Complex Machines (Ithaca, 1991), pp. 163–70.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Arden Bucholz 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arden Bucholz

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