Doppler Radar, Warnings, and Electric Power

  • Kevin M. Simmons
  • Daniel Sutter


The National Weather Service (NWS) underwent a thorough modernization in the early 1990s involving many changes and improvements (see Friday 1994 for details). The components of the modernization included an increase in the proportion of meteorologists employed, a consolidation and upgrading of the number of Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) across the nation, and the installation of new computer software with improved graphics for forecasters. The centerpiece of the modernization of the NWS was the deployment of over 100 new Doppler weather radars (Weather Surveillance Radar, or WSR-88D) and the linking of the radars together into the first nationwide weather radar network. The new Doppler radars immediately improved the skill of tornado warnings (Polger et al. 1994; Bieringer and Ray 1994).


Doppler Radar Power Outage Weather Radar Doppler Weather Radar National Weather Service 
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  1. Bieringer, P., and P. S. Ray, 1994: A Comparison of Tornado Warning Lead Times with and without NEXRAD Doppler Radar. Wea. Forecasting, 11, 47–52.Google Scholar
  2. Friday, E. W., Jr., 1994: The Modernization and Associated Restructuring of the National Weather Service: An Overview. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 75, 43–52.Google Scholar
  3. Polger, P. D., B. S. Goldsmith, R. C. Pryzwarty, and J. R. Bocchierri, 1994: National Weather Service Warning Performance Based on the WSR-88D. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 75, 203–214.Google Scholar
  4. Simmons, K. M., and D. Sutter. 2011. Economic and Societal Impacts of Torna-does. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kevin M. Simmons and Daniel Sutter 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin M. Simmons
  • Daniel Sutter

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