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Gas Hydrates pp 141-157 | Cite as

Industrial Applications

  • Carlo Giavarini
  • Keith Hester
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

This chapter considers some of the more actual and interesting technologies utilizing hydrates being developed for industrial application. Gas hydrates can be used to transport gas, especially in areas where infrastructure such as pipelines does not exist. To date, pilot plants and ships have been developed for this purpose. Hydrate could offer advantageous over other methods of gas transportation. Other technologies that have explored include using hydrates in separation processes. These applications range from desalinating brine and removing H2S or CO2 from acid gases. The possible role of hydrates in CO2 sequestration is also discussed, including ideas ranging from direct deep sea disposal to exchanging CO2 for methane in natural hydrate deposits.

Keywords

Methane Hydrate Integrate Gasification Combine Cycle Hydrate Dissociation Subsea Pipeline Middle Spacer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ingegneria ChimicaUniversity of Rome La SapienzaRomeItaly
  2. 2.TulsaUSA

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