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Gas Hydrates pp 117-140 | Cite as

Hydrates as an Energy Source

  • Carlo Giavarini
  • Keith Hester
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

This chapter centers on the potential role of hydrates as a future energy resource. The reader is introduced to the various nations actively pursuing research on producing gas from hydrates. The resource potential of hydrates is presented along with the current state-of-the-art in hydrate production methods and the types of hydrate reservoirs with the highest production potential. International projects focused on gas hydrate production are highlighted, both in the permafrost and marine settings. The chapter also gives some of the potential obstacles facing gas production from hydrates, along with the current economic projections.

Keywords

Well Bore Nankai Trough Bottom Simulated Reflector Hydrate Stability Hydrate Dissociation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ingegneria ChimicaUniversity of Rome La SapienzaRomeItaly
  2. 2.TulsaUSA

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