Advertisement

Dynamic Programming and Quadratic Programming for Vehicle Power Management

  • Xi Zhang
  • Chris Mi
Chapter
Part of the Power Systems book series (POWSYS)

Abstract

In this chapter, following the theoretical fundamentals, the applications of dynamic programming (DP) on several HEV types including series, parallel and series–parallel are specifically given. ADVISOR-based simulation results prove that the DP algorithm is capable of finding optimal power which is from the battery to the electric motor and then the power ratio between them. Quadratic programming (QP) is also contained in discussion of this chapter due to its advantages of saving computational time in real-time realization. The power management strategy on basis of QP algorithm for fuel optimization of PHEV is depicted in details.

Keywords

Power Management Dynamic Program Algorithm Hybrid Electric Vehicle Planetary Gear Drive Train 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Bertsekas DP (1976) Dynamic programming and stochastic control. Academic Press, New YorkMATHGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dreyfus S (2002) Richard Bellman on the birth of dynamic programming. Oper Res 50:48–51MathSciNetMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nocedal J, Wright SJ (2006) Numerical optimization. Springer Science+Business Media, Inc, New YorkMATHGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dynamic programming. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_programming. Accessed 2 Jan 2010
  5. 5.
    Bellman R, Kalaba R (1957) On the role of dynamic programming in statistical communication theory. IRE Trans Inf Theory 3:197–203CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sakoe H, Chiba S (1978) Dynamic programming algorithm optimization for spoken word recognition. IEEE Trans Acoust Speech Signal Process 26:43–49MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Fallahi A, Hossain E (2009) A dynamic programming approach for QoS-aware power management in wireless video sensor networks. IEEE Trans Veh Technol 58:843–854CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Carrano EG, Cardoso RTN, Takahashi RHC et al (2008) Power distribution network expansion scheduling using dynamic programming genetic algorithm. IET Gener Transm Distrib 2:444CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Koot MWT (2006) Energy management for vehicular electric power systems. Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, The NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Koot M, Jager BD, Steinbuch M (2005) Energy management strategies for vehicular electric power systems. IEEE Trans Veh Technol 54:771–782CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Scordia J, Desbois-Renaudin M, Trigui R, Jeanneret B et al (2005) Global optimisation of energy management laws in hybrid vehicles using dynamic programming. Int J Veh Des 39:349–367CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Liu J, Peng H (2008) Modeling and control of a power-split hybrid vehicle. IEEE Trans Contr Syst Tech 16:1242–1251CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sciarretta A, Guzzella L (2007) Control of hybrid electric vehicles. IEEE Contr Syst Mag 27:60–70CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Si J, Barto AG, Powell WB et al (2004) Handbook of learning and approximate dynamic programming. Wiley-IEEE Press, Hoboken, New JerseyCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Kaufmann A, Cruon R (1967) Dynamic programming sequential scientific management. Academic Press, New YorkMATHGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Berteskas DP (2007) Dynamic programming and optimal control, 3rd edn. Athena Scientific, Nashua, New HampshireGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Katsargyri GE (2008) Optimally controlling hybrid electric vehicles using path forecasting. Master thesis, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Husain I (2003) Electric and hybrid vehicles design fundamentals. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FloridaGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Ehsani M, Gao Y, Emadi A (2009) Modern electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles: fundamentals. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FloridaGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Kessels JTBA, Koot MWT, van den Bosch PPJ et al (2008) Online energy management for hybrid electric vehicles. IEEE Trans Veh Technol 57:3428–3440CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Scordia J, Desbois-Renaudin M, Trigui R et al (2005) Global optimisation of energy management laws in hybrid vehicles using dynamic programming. Int J Veh Des 39:349–369CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    NREL (2009) Transferring NREL’s advanced vehicle simulator to industry. http://www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/success_advisor.html. Accessed 4 Jan 2010
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
    Dieselnet (2000) http://www.dieselnet.com/standards/cycles/ftp72.html. Accessed 2 Jan 2010
  25. 25.
    Dieselnet (2000) http://www.dieselnet.com/standards/cycles/hwfet.html. Accessed 2 Jan 2010
  26. 26.
    Chen Z, Mi CC (2009) An adaptive online energy management controller for power-split HEV based on dynamic programming and fuzzy logic. VPPC09 2009:335Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited  2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of Michigan-DearbornDearbornUSA

Personalised recommendations