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Reliability

  • Wallace R. Blischke
  • M. Rezaul Karim
  • D. N. Prabhakar Murthy
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Reliability Engineering book series (RELIABILITY)

Abstract

Warranty servicing costs depend on product reliability and this in turns is influenced by several factorsᾢsome under the control of the manufacturer (decisions made during the design and production phases of the product) and others under the control of the customer (operating environment, usage mode and intensity). A proper understanding of product reliability requires understanding various concepts from reliability theory from a product life cycle perspective. In this chapter, we discuss various topics from reliability theory that will be used in later chapters. These include (1) different notions of reliability, ranging from design to field reliability; (2) reliability modeling, varying from the very simplest models to complex models that capture the many factors (usage, maintenance, environment, etc.) that affect product reliability; and (3) the link between product reliability and warranty.

Keywords

Hazard Function Assembly Error Product Failure Compete Risk Model Product Reliability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wallace R. Blischke
    • 1
  • M. Rezaul Karim
    • 2
  • D. N. Prabhakar Murthy
    • 3
  1. 1.Sherman Oaks, Los AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of StatisticsRajshahi UniversityRajshahiBangladesh
  3. 3.School of Mechanical and Mining EngineeringThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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