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Postoperative Physical Therapy for Foot and Ankle Surgery

  • Amol Saxena
  • Allison N. Granot

Abstract

Evidence-based studies for foot and ankle rehabilitation mainly focus on preventative and nonsurgical rehabilitation of Achilles and ankle injuries. Postoperative protocols have not been studied for many of the surgical procedures in this text. Only ankle stabilization surgery has been studied comparing 6 weeks of below-knee casting versus earlier range of motion (ROM) with shorter periods of casting. Karlsson et al. studied a randomized group of patients undergoing surgery for chronic (greater than 6 months) ankle instability and found an earlier return to sports and work when patient began controlled ankle ROM at 3 weeks post-surgery and formalized strengthening at 5 weeks, as compared to those who started physical therapy after 6 weeks of below-knee casting.1 We consider this study a good basis for all types of foot and ankle procedures and therefore use it as justification for our various protocols, i.e., initiation of active ROM at 3 weeks post-surgery and some form of strengthening by 5–6 weeks post-operative, (and often earlier).

Keywords

Ankle Instability Ankle Injury Physical Therapy Session Ankle Surgery Posterior Ankle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Matt Richardson, DPT and Marc Guillet, MSPT for their assistance with this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sports MedicinePAFMG-Palo Alto DivisionPalo AltoUSA
  2. 2.Dept of Physical TherapyPalo Alto Medical FoundationPalo AltoUSA

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