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Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus

  • Amol Saxena

Abstract

Talar lesions are extremely common with all types of ankle injuries including sprains and fractures. Some report that in up to 50% of ankle fractures and severe sprains, some type of talar lesion will occur. These are common sports injuries and are found with all types of ankle sprains and fracture/dislocations.1-3 When talar lesions occur acutely, they are typically operated on immediately post-injury if there is a significantly ­displaced fragment. Most lesions are dealt with ­sub-acutely or chronically.

Keywords

Articular Cartilage Ankle Sprain Osteochondral Lesion Osteochondritis Dissecans Ankle Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sports MedicinePAFMG-Palo Alto DivisionPalo AltoUSA

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