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Thrombolytics/Anticoagulants

  • James C. Coons
  • Sandeep Devabhakthuni
Chapter

Abstract

Critically ill patients are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, which is a common complication that is associated with significant mortality and requires appropriate anticoagulation.1,2 Recently, anticoagulants have been identified as high-alert medications by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices because of their risk for significant patient harm if misused.2 A study by Fanikos and colleagues demonstrates that 1.67 medication errors occur for every 1,000 patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, and unfractionated heparin (UFH) accounts for a majority (66.2%) of medication errors. Furthermore, approximately 6.2% of patients affected by anticoagulant errors require some type of medical intervention, and 1.5% of patients experience prolonged hospitalization due to anticoagulant effects.3 The most common types of medication errors regarding anticoagulant use are omission (29%), improper dose/quantity (27.9%), and prescribing (14.5%) errors.4

Keywords

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Acute Coronary Syndrome Major Bleeding Hepatic Impairment Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PharmacyAllegheny General HospitalPittsburghUSA

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