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Lymphedema pp 219-227 | Cite as

Physiological Principles of Physiotherapy

  • Waldemar L. Olszewski
Chapter

Abstract

Lymphedema of the extremities is caused by insufficient transport of tissue fluid via the lymphatics. The inadequacy of the lymphatic conduits is most commonly caused: (a) by their obliteration after infectious inflammation and subsequent scarring, (b) by their interruption during lymphadenectomy, and (c) after local irradiation and trauma. Impairment of transport capacity is the consequence of anatomical lesions caused by destruction of valves, degeneration of muscle cells, and obstruction of lumen by clot and external fibrous scarring.

Keywords

Tissue Fluid Manual Lymphatic Drainage Manual Massage Muscular Fascia Hard Skin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Waldemar L. Olszewski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgical Research and TransplantologyMedical Research CentreWarsawPoland

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