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Lymphedema pp 83-88 | Cite as

Clinical Diagnosis: General Overview

  • Mauro Andrade
Chapter

Abstract

Lymphedema, or lymphatic edema, refers to increased volume of body segments due to localized or extensive lymphatic system disturbances that cause decreased lymph transport, without regard to the primary cause. Characteristically, chronic lymph stasis promotes both fluid accumulation and tissue changes. Defective uptake of large molecules retains water within the interstitial space and, over time, lymph stasis leads to progressive tissue changes, characterized by abnormal growth of subcutaneous tissue and intercellular matrix, and increased skin thickness. It is noteworthy that, beyond tissue fluid control, lymphatics play other important roles in tissue homeostasis, which makes lymphedema unique and far more complex than edema caused by other vascular or systemic factors.

Keywords

Venous Insufficiency Lower Limb Edema Intestinal Lymphangiectasias Lower Limb Lymphedema Yellow Nail 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Andrade
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of São Paulo Medical SchoolSão PauloBrazil

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