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Introduction

  • Luis Puigjaner
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

This chapter briefly introduces the main components that play a role in syngas production technologies. First, the thermochemical principles underlying the syngas production process are enunciated. Second, the suitable raw materials for gasification, the products obtained, and their end uses are identified. Third, the advantages, opportunities, present commercial status, and future perspectives of gasification are discussed. Finally, the need for enhanced technologies supported by the development of an appropriate framework for a robust design and optimization is justified. These issues are covered in detail in this book and should prove useful for assessing current technologies, conveying novel concepts and providing the basis for the future technological advancement of sustainable clean syngas production at a competitive advantage.

Keywords

Sewage Sludge Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Gasification Integrate Gasification Combine Cycle Syngas Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notation

BGC

British Gas Corporation

CCS

Carbon Capture and Storage

ERG

Eastern Research Group

IGCC

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle

MSW

Municipal Solid Waste

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ETSEIBUniversitat Politècnica de CatalunyaBarcelonaSpain

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