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Risk-Based Resource Allocation Models for Aviation Security

  • Laura A. McLay
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Reliability Engineering book series (RELIABILITY)

Abstract

The events of September 11, 2001 led to sweeping nationwide changes in aviation security policy and operations. The piecemeal and reactive nature of many of these changes has resulted in large increases in costs and inconvenience to travelers. The August 2006 arrest in London of several suspected terrorists plotting to blow up 10 US-bound transatlantic flights, and the ensuing changes in airport security procedures, serve to further illustrate this point.

Keywords

Markov Decision Process System Alarm Security Class Aviation Security Security Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number 2008-DN-077-ARI001-02. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Statistical Sciences & Operations ResearchVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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