Investigation of Nuclear Plant Safety Utilizing an Analytical Risk Management Model

  • Stephen M. Hess
  • John P. Gaertner
Conference paper


In this paper we present use of risk management as an approach to control nuclear plant safety risk. This approach relies on processes currently embedded in the organizational structure and business practices of commercially operating plants; thus it can be implemented at a cost that is much lower than recent applications of risk-informed, performance-based regulatory initiatives. Additionally, a mathematical dynamical systems model that accounts for the interaction of those processes that provide significant impact on plant risk is presented. Some results from application of the model and insights obtained from its analysis are discussed.


Risk Management Dynamical System Model Electric Power Research Institute Stable Fixed Point Risk Management Process 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen M. Hess
    • 1
  • John P. Gaertner
    • 2
  1. 1.Sensortex, Inc.Kennett SquareUSA
  2. 2.Electric Power Research InstituteCharlotteUSA

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