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Nuclear Action Reliability Assessment (NARA): A Data-Based HRA Tool

  • Barry Kirwan
  • Huw Gibson
  • Richard Kennedy
  • Jim Edmunds
  • Garry Cooksley
  • Ian Umbers

Abstract

In the UK, as elsewhere, probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) are carried out to assure the safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since human error and recovery are key attributes of a risk assessment approach, Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) approaches are used to account for the human contribution (positive as well as negative) to risk. In the UK, for the past decade, the principal tool used to quantify the reliabilities of human interactions has been the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) [1,2].

Keywords

Human Error Risk Assessment Approach Operator Inexperience Probabilistic Safety Assessment Human Error Probability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Kirwan
    • 1
  • Huw Gibson
    • 2
  • Richard Kennedy
    • 2
  • Jim Edmunds
    • 3
  • Garry Cooksley
    • 3
  • Ian Umbers
    • 4
  1. 1.EurocontrolBretigny/OrgeFrance
  2. 2.University of BirminghamUK
  3. 3.Corporate Risk AssociatesLeatherheadUK
  4. 4.British EnergyBarnwoodUK

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