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Virtual Learning Environments: Improving Accessibility Using Profiling

  • S. Schofield
  • N. Hine
  • J. Arnott
  • S. Joel
  • A. Judson
  • R. Rentoul
Conference paper

Abstract

There is growing interest in and use of virtual learning environments in the delivery of course material, given their claimed advantages of temporal and spatial independence. The UK Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (UK Government, 2001) both strengthens the right for students with special educational needs to be educated in mainstream schools (integration) and ensures that these students are able to receive equivalent pedagogical experiences (inclusion). The impact on the teaching profession is a serious issue - the main concern expressed by English head-teachers regarding inclusion of special education needs students in primary schools was that of resource allocation (Archeret al 2002).

Keywords

Assistive Technology Virtual Learning Environment Sharable Content Object Reference Model Adaptive Learning Environment Advanced Distribute Learn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Schofield
  • N. Hine
  • J. Arnott
  • S. Joel
  • A. Judson
  • R. Rentoul

There are no affiliations available

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