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Is Universal Design a Critical Theory?

  • N. D’souza

Abstract

Universal design is a term that was first used in the United States by Ron Mace (1985) although forms of it were quite prevalent in Europe long before. For the purpose of this chapter Universal Design is defined as ’the design of all products and environments to be usable by people of all ages and abilities to the greatest extent possible (Story, 2001, p. 10.3). Universal design in recent years has assumed growing importance as a new paradigm that aims at a holistic approach ranging in scale from product design (Balaram, 2001) to architecture (Mace, 1985), and urban design (Steinfield, 2001) on one hand and systems of media (Goldberg, 2001) and information technology (Brewer, 2001) on the other.

Keywords

Social Reality Social Inclusion Critical Theory Universal Design Positive Science 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. D’souza

There are no affiliations available

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